Useful links

  • The Quinebaug and Shetucket Rivers Valley of Northeastern Connecticut has been called “the Last Green Valley” because satellite pictures taken at night reveal it to be the only dark area in the sprawling metropolitan Boston-to-Washington corridor. In 1994, Congress created the Quinebaug and Shetucket Rivers Valley National Heritage Corridor, recognizing the region as a unique national resource. The Quinebaug-Shetucket Heritage Corridor manages the corridor and is dedicated to preserving “the Last Green Valley” and its historical and cultural values. They support the Conservation Commissions along the corridor and provide educational programs for the public, including the very popular Walking WeekendS in the fall.

  • The Connecticut DEP helps to protect our environment and manage our natural resources. Their web site has a lot of information about outdoor recreation in the State.

  • The Northeast Connecticut Visitors District supports tourism in the twenty-one towns in the northeast corner of the state.

  • The Connecticut Botanical Society web site will help you identify plants in our region. They also have a lot of good information about local ferns.

  • The New England Wild Flower Society maintains the "Garden in the Woods" in Framingham--a showcase of regional wild plants and habitats. They run a series of educational programs and field trips during the year.

  • The Rhode Island Wild Plant Society is very active. They also run educational programs and field trips.

  • The Integrated Pest Management (IPM) website from the University of Connecticut describes their sustainable approach to managing pests. They offer workshops and training opportunities that assist farmers and homeowners to understand how they can use pesticides and herbicides in a way that is more beneficial for the natural environment. They work on different methods of reducing the use of chemicals to protect water quality and for various other reasons.

  • The University of Connecticut NEMO Project is designed to provide information to land-use commissions.

  • The Connecticut Audubon Society helps to preserve our open spaces and educate the public on conservation issues. They manage the Connecticut Audubon Center at Pomfret and the Center at Trailwood in Hampton, both of which offer field trips and educational programs.

  • The Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group web site describes the threat of invasive plants. It also tells you how to identify invasive plants and suggests methods for eradicating them.

  • The Connecticut Forest and Park Association helps to maintain healthy and renewable woodlands by educating landowners. They also maintain the Blue Blazed trail system in the state.

  • The Killingly Historical Society maintains one of the best genealogical databases in the region. They reside in the Bugbee Library on Main Street in Danielson and are well worth a visit.

  • The Woodstock Conservation Commission has a wonderful web site with a lot of fascinating information that is relevant to everybody in our region.